A Day in the Life of Two Sea Star Labs | The Node

The authors are using the bat star, Patiria miniata, to explore fundamental biological questions. Credit: Daniel George, iNaturalist

In this blog post for The Node, three ░─├┼┴¨║¤▓╩appresearchers explain why they love the sea star as a research organism and the questions it is helping them to ask.

What comes to mind when I say, ÔÇťsea starÔÇŁ? For me, I think of easily accessible eggs that we can fertilized┬áin vitro┬áto make completely clear larvae that grow in a 6-well dish. Ah yes, I guess you were also thinking about snorkeling in a transparent ocean!

My name is Margherita Perillo and I am a Research Scientist at the ░─├┼┴¨║¤▓╩appin beautiful Woods Hole right in Cape Cod. My research focuses mostly on understanding tissue and organ morphogenesis: How do individual cells group together to form complex organs? The system I chose to establish to investigate this question is the sea star┬áPatiria miniata┬álarva. In this short article, together with Zak Swartz (Assistant Scientist at ░─├┼┴¨║¤▓╩appwho also works with sea stars) and Jamie MacKinnon (Research Assistant from the Swartz Lab), we explain why we love this research animal.

A Day in the Life of Two Sea Star Labs | The Node